Category Archives: Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting Is Probably Good For You

Eating within a 10-hour window shouldn’t be too hard. Breakfast at 7 AM, finish dinner by 5 PM. That’s right, we don’t need to be eating every 3–4 hours. Do you think our ancestors over the last 200,000 years have been eating three meals a day? I don’t. The probably went 24–48 hrs without much food on a regular basis.

From LA Times:

In an early effort to explore the benefits of daily fasting in humans, researchers have found that people who are at high risk of developing diabetes improved their health in myriad ways when they ate all of their meals over a span of just over 10 hours, then fasted for the remainder of their 24-hour day.

Source: Variant of intermittent fasting improved health in new study – Los Angeles Times

Steve Parker, M.D.

Steve Parker MD, Advanced Mediterranean Diet

Click the pic to purchase at Amazon.com. E-book versions also available at Smashwords. com.

Prediabetes Is a Problem for U.S. Adolescents and Young Adults

Great exercise but with risk of concussions, broken bones, and torn menisci

Obesity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes in adults and also plays a significant role in the development of the disease at younger ages. Obesity is highly prevalent among US adolescents and young adults. Many adolescents and young adults with obesity already have blood sugar metabolism abnormalities, which is of great public health concern in view of the sharp increase in type 2 diabetes in adolescence.

From JAMA Network:

In the United States, about 1 of 5 adolescents and 1 of 4 young adults have prediabetes. The adjusted prevalence of prediabetes is higher in male individuals and in people with obesity. Adolescents and young adults with prediabetes also present an unfavorable cardiometabolic risk profile, putting them both at increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

Source: Prevalence of Prediabetes Among Adolescents and Young Adults in the United States, 2005-2016 | Adolescent Medicine | JAMA Pediatrics | JAMA Network

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: Regular exercise and loss of excess fat weight are two great ways to prevent both prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. They also help with treatment.

Steve Parker MD, Advanced Mediterranean Diet

Click the pic to purchase at Amazon.com. E-book versions also available at Smashwords. com.

 

A practical guide to the Mediterranean diet – From Harvard

There are myriad reasons the traditional Mediterranean diet is considered one of the healthiest diets. From Harvard Medical Publishing, an article written by a Registered Dietitian:

The Mediterranean diet has received much attention as a healthy way to eat, and with good reason. The Mediterranean diet has been shown to reduce risk of heart disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, certain cancers, depression, and in older adults, a decreased risk of frailty, along with better mental and physical function. In January [2019], US News and World Report named it the “best diet overall” for the second year running.

Source: A practical guide to the Mediterranean diet – Harvard Health Blog – Harvard Health Publishing

Ready to get started? Click the link above.

Ready to lose weight and start a fitness program, too? Click the pic below.

Steve Parker, M.D.

Steve Parker MD, Advanced Mediterranean Diet

Click the pic to purchase at Amazon.com. E-book versions also available at Smashwords. com.

 

Substitution of Tea or Coffee for Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Linked to Lower Type 2 Diabetes Incidence in Europe

Green tea

Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. If you want to avoid T2 diabetes, what should you substitute? The study at hand looked at milk, juice, coffee, and tea. Why not water?

From The Journal of Nutrition:

These findings indicate a potential benefit of substituting coffee or tea for SSBs for the primary prevention of T2D and may help formulate public health recommendations on beverage consumption in different populations.

Source: Estimated Substitution of Tea or Coffee for Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Was Associated with Lower Type 2 Diabetes Incidence in Case–Cohort Analysis across 8 European Countries in the EPIC-InterAct Study | The Journal of Nutrition | Oxford Academic

Steve Parker, M.D.

Steve Parker MD, Advanced Mediterranean Diet

Two diets in one book, including the Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet

Mediterranean Diet Reduced Pregnancy-Related Diabetes and Weight Gain

You can read the whole study at PLOS. The conclusion:

A simple, individualised, Mediterranean-style diet in pregnancy did not reduce the overall risk of adverse maternal and offspring complications but has the potential to reduce gestational weight gain [but not by much] and the risk of gestational diabetes [by 35%].

Source: Mediterranean-style diet in pregnant women with metabolic risk factors (ESTEEM): A pragmatic multicentre randomised trial

PS: Don’t try to lose weight during pregnancy without professional help.

Steve Parker MD, Advanced Mediterranean Diet

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Eating Mediterranean Diet During Pregnancy Reduces Gestational Diabetes Risk

Wouldn’t be surprised if she had gestational diabetes.

From Newsweek:

Eating a Mediterranean diet while pregnant could prevent women at risk of gestational diabetes from developing the condition, a study has found.

The women who took part in the study followed a Mediterranean-style diet, by eating more nuts, extra virgin olive oil, fish, white meat and pulses; while cutting their levels of red meat, butter, margarine, and cream. Researchers also asked the women to avoid sugary drinks, fast food, and those high in animal fats.

Source: Eating Mediterranean Diet During Pregnancy Could Cut Gestational Diabetes Risk: Study

Steve Parker, M.D.

Steve Parker MD, Advanced Mediterranean Diet

Click the pic to purchase at Amazon.com

Higher HemoblobinA1c Levels Linked to Cognitive Decline Over Time

HgbA1c (hemoglobin A1c) is a blood test that reflects average blood sugar levels over the previous three months. From a 2018 study:

In this community-based population, we observed a significant trend for cognitive decline over a 10 year period among individuals aged ≥50 years with normoglycaemia, prediabetes or diabetes at baseline. Additionally, HbA1c levels were linearly associated with subsequent cognitive decline in memory and executive function (but not orientation) irrespective of diabetes status at baseline.

Source: HbA1c, diabetes and cognitive decline: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing | SpringerLink

h/t to Jan at The Low-Carb Diabetic

Steve Parker, M.D.

Steve Parker MD, Advanced Mediterranean Diet

Click the pic to purchase at Amazon.com in the U.S.