Are You Serious About Losing Weight in 2018?

Then you better start preparing. Read this.


“Hmmm…What’s the best way to lose weight?”

 

How Does the Mediterranean Diet Protect Against Disease?

From the Journals of Gerontology:

Consuming a Mediterranean diet rich in minimally processed plant foods has been associated with a reduced risk of developing multiple chronic diseases and increased life expectancy. Data from several randomized clinic trials have demonstrated a beneficial effect in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, atrial fibrillation and breast cancer. The exact mechanism by which an increased adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet exerts its favorable effects is not known. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the five most important adaptations induced by the Mediterranean dietary pattern are: (1) lipid lowering effect, (2) protection against oxidative stress, inflammation and platelet aggregation, (3) modification of hormones and growth factors involved in the pathogenesis of cancer, (4) inhibition of nutrient sensing pathways by specific amino acid restriction, and (4) gut microbiota-mediated production of metabolites influencing metabolic health. More studies are needed to understand how single modifications of nutrients typical of the Mediterranean diet interact with energy intake, energy expenditure, and the microbiome in modulating the key mechanisms that promote cellular, tissue, and organ health during aging.

Remember the Reason for the Season

Stained glass window created by F. Zettler (1878-1911) at the German Church (St. Gertrude’s church) in Gamla Stan in Stockholm, depicting a Nativity Scene.

How Did Walter White Lose That Weight in “Breaking Bad”?

That’s a guacamole deviled egg.
Photo Copyright: Steve Parker

In 2014 Howard Stern interviewed Bryan Cranston and asked how he lost weight so quickly for his role as Walter White on Breaking Bad:

“Stern: When you had chemo and was getting sick playing the part of Walter White, in order to go through rapid weight loss you deliberately didn’t eat for 10 days? True or false?

Cranston: False.

Stern: How’d you lose all that weight?

Cranston: No carbohydrates. I just took out all the carbohydrates.

Stern: How much weight did you drop?

Cranston: 16 pounds, in ten days.

Stern: Painful?

Cranston: No. The first three days are really hard, ’cause your body’s changing and craving sugar and wants, you know, and then you deprive it of the sugar and it starts burning fat.”

Source: How Walter White lost weight in Breaking Bad, it wasn’t chemo – High Steaks

h/t Tom Naughton

My Wife Unboxes an Anova Precision Cooker

My wife got interested in the sous vide cooking method last year. She gave her original Anova cooker away to someone and replaced it with another brand that broke and shocked her, literally. We just got our new Anova and made this unboxing video.

We’ve noticed in our corner of the universe that steaks are getting more expensive. Sous vide cooking allows us to use cheaper and tougher cuts of meat and it comes out very tender. The method often yields foods that are also more flavorful and juicier compared to other cooking styles.

Hank’s First Hike

Hank (son of Tank), a yellow lab

Hank is six months old. Weighs about 60 lb, on the way to 90.

A collection of cairns half way up

Starting at the north trailhead, we made it 3/4 of the way to Tom’s Thumb, three miles round-trip, with 800 feet of vertical elevation.

I needed a selfie-stick

Hank did great on his very first nature hike. No apparent tiredness or soreness from it, whereas my knees were achy for the subsequent 48 hours. This was my first hike since the June trek up Humphreys Peak. On the way down I was wishing I had my trekking poles, but I can’t handle them and a leash.

Steve Parker, M.D.

NASEM: Current U.S. Dietary Guidelines Aren’t Trustworthy

Back to the drawing board

NASEM is the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Dr. Andy Harris writes that:

The nation’s senior scientific body recently released a new report raising serious questions about the “scientific rigor” of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. This report confirms what many in government have suspected for years and is the reason why Congress mandated this report in the first place: our nation’s top nutrition policy is not based on sound science.

Dr. Harris notes that since 1980, when the guidelines were first published, rates of obesity have doubled and diabetes has quadrupled.

Current recommendations to reduce saturated fat consumption and to eat health whole grains do not, after all, reduce rates of cardiovascular disease. That was my conclusion in 2009.

For a mere $68 you can read the NASEM report yourself. Better yet, read Tom Naughton’s thoughts for free.

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: The diets I’ve designed are contrary to U.S. Dietary Guidelines.