Monica Reinagel Considers Whether Calcium Supplements Are Safe or Not

 

Death in a bottle?

Death in a bottle?

Monica is a smart and media-savvy nutritionist who brought me on board as a blogger at NutritionData many years ago. Click the link below for her surprising conclusion on calcium supplementation.

Monica writes:

“The National Osteoporosis Foundation published a new report this week, insisting that calcium supplements are safe for your heart. Two weeks ago, Johns Hopkins cardiologist Erin Michos published a paper saying the opposite.

She claims that the NOF review (which was funded by a pharmaceutical company that makes calcium supplements) omitted certain studies (such as the ones she included in her own review) that might have changed the conclusion.

These are just the latest two volleys in a five-year-long tennis match between experts on whether you should or shouldn’t take calcium supplements.  And you thought politics was divisive.”

Source: Calcium Supplements: Safe or Not?

Is Your Workout Routine a Good Match for Your Genetics?

It’s well known among experts but not the hoi poloi that some folks don’t respond to exercise programs with an increase in fitness. And if you’re not responding, your exercise program may be a massive waste of time.

Check out this article at NYT:
“These data suggest that “there is no one-size-fits-all approach to exercise,” says Brendon Gurd, an associate professor of kinesiology at Queen’s University who oversaw the study. “But it does seem as if there is some size that fits everyone.”

The question is how to determine which form of exercise best fits you [endurance versus high-intensity interval training].

The answer, Dr. Gurd says, is simple trial and error.”

Read the article for a three-week test that may tell you which is best for you.

Death By Alcohol Is Increasingly Popular Among White Women in U.S.

Perhaps she should reconsider

Perhaps she should reconsider

Did you wake up with a hangover today?

From the Washington Post:

“Drinking is killing twice as many middle-aged white women as it did 18 years ago.

Generally, middle age (age 35 to 54)  is not the time to die in modern societies. It is past teenage dangers, before the serious perils of age, and improved medical care and public-health campaigns are keeping more people alive.

So why are middle-aged white women dying more often even while death rates for other groups continue to go down? What are white women doing that is so different?

One simple answer is: a lot more drinking.

Source: Nine charts that show how white women are drinking themselves to death – The Washington Post

A bit off-topic, but I’d define middle-aged as 40 to 65.

From the same Post article:

“The Washington Post has spent the year crossing the country to look into causes and repercussions of the strange increase in deaths among middle-aged white women and men. Alcohol, opioids and suicide are important factors. See the full coverage here.”

NYT: New Ebola Vaccine Gives 100 Percent Protection 

I don’t know anyone who went into medicine or nursing seriously considering that their job might kill them. So this Ebola vaccine is good news:

“In a scientific triumph that will change the way the world fights a terrifying killer, an experimental Ebola vaccine tested on humans in the waning days of the West African epidemic has been shown to provide 100 percent protection against the lethal disease.

The vaccine has not yet been approved by any regulatory authority, but it is considered so effective that an emergency stockpile of 300,000 doses has already been created for use should an outbreak flare up again.”

RTWT.

Seafood Farmed in China is Tainted with Antibiotics and Bacteria

The problem isn’t the antibiotics per se, but that fact that over-use of antibiotics lead to “super-bugs” (bacteria) that are hard to kill with standard antibiotics in the Western world.

Most of the smoked oyster tins I find in supermarkets in southern Arizona are from China. Now I wonder where the shrimp are from.

From PJMedia.com:

“Imported farm-raised seafood from China is tainted with antibiotics and often salmonella, U.S. regulators say, and the tainted fish is making its way to American tables.

The problem is, Asian fish farmers often supplement their fish feed with feces from pigs and geese, which contain harmful bacteria and antibiotics that have a direct impact on the seafood we eat. According to the latest research, up to 90 percent of the antibiotics administered to pigs pass through their urine and feces.

The U.S. Department of Commerce slapped a 112 percent tariff on Chinese shrimp, effective 2005, but unfortunately, Chinese suppliers have found ways to get around that.”

Source: Seafood Farmed in Asia is Tainted with Antibiotics

Merry Christmas!

Stained glass window created by F. Zettler (1878-1911) at the German Church (St. Gertrude's church) in Gamla Stan in Stockholm, depicting a Nativity Scene. This window was created more than 100 years ago, no property release is required.christmas

Stained glass window created by F. Zettler (1878-1911) at the German Church (St. Gertrude’s church) in Gamla Stan in Stockholm, depicting a Nativity Scene. This window was created more than 100 years ago.

Is It Time You Got a Pressure Cooker?

Vegetarian Fried Rice with bits of cabbage, carrot, celery, and (?) cilantro.

Vegetarian Fried Rice with bits of cabbage, carrot, celery, and (?) cilantro.

Judging from the bloggers I follow, pressure cookers started making a comeback within the last couple years. I remember my mother decades ago occasionally using one, for what, I don’t know. I’ve been thinking about a pressure cooker myself recently as I learn more about Indian cooking.

As you may know, many Indians are vegetarians. The eat lots of legumes, as do non-veg Indians, as an important source of protein. If you cook dried beans, it normally takes hours unless you get them from a can, pre-cooked. A pressure cooker reduces cooking time to 40 minutes.

Dr. Travis Saunders recently wrote about his pressure cooker, which was inspired by Dr. Stephan Guyenet. Travis wrote:

For those who are unfamiliar with pressure cookers, they’re a bit like slow cookers. The difference is that they seal in pressure (this is why the old fashioned ones sometimes exploded when left unattended), so they can cook food much faster than a regular stove or slow cooker. So things that would normally cook all day, can be cooked in under an hour.

Travis uses his to make yogurt and soup. It also cooks rice. 

I’m gonna get one.

Steve Parker, M.D.