Category Archives: Uncategorized

Very Low Calorie Meal-Replacement Diets Seem to Be Making a Comeback

“Abstract

Objective

To test the effectiveness and safety of a total diet replacement (TDR) programme for routine treatment of obesity in a primary care setting.Design Pragmatic, two arm, parallel group, open label, individually randomised controlled trial.Setting 10 primary care practices in Oxfordshire, UK.

Participants 278 adults who were obese and seeking support to lose weight: 138 were assigned to the TDR programme and 140 to usual care. 73% of participants were re-measured at 12 months.Interventions The TDR programme comprised weekly behavioural support for 12 weeks and monthly support for three months, with formula food products providing 810 kcal/day (3389 kJ/day) as the sole food during the first eight weeks followed by reintroduction of food. Usual care comprised behavioural support for weight loss from a practice nurse and a diet programme with modest energy restriction.

Main outcome measures

The primary outcome was weight change at 12 months analysed as intention to treat with mixed effects models. Secondary outcomes included biomarkers of cardiovascular and metabolic risk. Adverse events were recorded.Results Participants in the TDR group lost more weight (−10.7 kg) than those in the usual care group (−3.1 kg): adjusted mean difference −7.2 kg (95% confidence interval −9.4 to −4.9 kg). 45% of participants in the TDR group and 15% in the usual care group experienced weight losses of 10% or more. The TDR group showed greater improvements in biomarkers of cardiovascular and metabolic risk than the usual care group. 11% of participants in the TDR group and 12% in the usual care group experienced adverse events of moderate or greater severity.

Conclusions

Compared with regular weight loss support from a practice nurse, a programme of weekly behavioural support and total diet replacement providing 810 kcal/day seems to be tolerable, and leads to substantially greater weight loss and greater improvements in the risk of cardiometabolic disease.”

Source: Doctor Referral of Overweight People to Low Energy total diet replacement Treatment (DROPLET): pragmatic randomised controlled trial | The BMJ

Another Reason to Drink Green Tea: Lower Incidence of Kidney Stones

In a Chinese population, green tea consumption was linked to 15-20% lower risk of kidney stones:

“During 319 211 and 696 950 person-years of follow up, respectively, 1202 men and 1451 women reported incident stones. Approximately two-thirds of men and one-quarter of women were tea drinkers at baseline, of whom green tea was the primary type consumed (95% in men, 88% in women). Tea drinkers (men: hazard ratio 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.69-0.88; women: hazard ratio 0.8, 95% confidence interval 0.77-0.98) and specifically green tea drinkers (men: hazard ratio 0.78, 95% confidence interval 0.69-0.88; women: hazard ratio 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.74-0.95) had lower incident risk than never/former drinkers. Compared with never/former drinkers, a stronger dose-response trend was observed for the amount of dried tea leaf consumed/month by men (hazard ratiohighest category 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.56-0.80, Ptrend  < 0.001) than by women (hazard ratiohighest category 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.70-1.08, Ptrend  = 0.041).

CONCLUSIONS:Green tea intake is associated with a lower risk of incident kidney stones, and the benefit is observed more strongly among men.”

Source: Green tea intake and risk of incident kidney stones: Prospective cohort studies in middle-aged and elderly Chinese individuals. – PubMed – NCBI

Mediterranean diet increases lifespan

No surprise here…

“The Mediterranean diet was linked to prolonged survival in two different studies spanning multiple age groups, according to findings recently published in the British Journal of Nutrition.

“We already knew that the Mediterranean diet is able to reduce the risk of mortality in the general population, but we did not know whether it would be the same specifically for elderly people,” Marialaura Bonaccio, PhD, epidemiologist at the Istituto Neurologico Meditteraneo Neuromed in Italy, said in a press release.

Researchers conducted a longitudinal analysis on the dietary habits of 5,200 participants of a previously existing cohort.

They found that for each one-point increase in a patient’s Mediterranean diet score, the risk for mortality from a variety of causes declined: all-cause mortality (HR = 0.94; 95% CI 0.9-0.98); coronary artery disease/cerebrovascular disease mortality (HR = 0·91; 95% CI, 0.83-0.99) and non-cardiovascular/non-cancer mortality (HR = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.81-0.96).”

Source: Mediterranean diet increases lifespan

Study: Mediterranean Diet Linked to Improved Gestational Diabetes Outcomes

“Women with gestational diabetes who were on a Mediterranean diet for 3 months had improved glycemic levels, that were comparable to pregnant women with normal glucose levels, a new study from Madrid, Spain suggests.

The objective of the study was to assess whether Mediterranean diet-based medical nutrition therapy facilitates near-normoglycemia in women with gestational diabetes.

“Medical nutrition therapy based on a MedDiet enhanced with extra virgin olive oil and pistachios, thus with a high-fat content, is associated with glycemic control and with a reduction in gestational diabetes-related adverse perinatal outcomes,” Dr. Alfonso Calle-Pascual, one of the study authors told dLife.”

Source: Mediterranean Diet Linked to Improved Gestational Diabetes Outcomes, Study | dLife

Mediterranean Diet Associated with 41% Risk Reduction for Macular Degeneration, a Leading Cause of Blindness

I thought we already knew this…

Protecting a patient’s eyes may be more heavily influenced by diet than previously thought. A new study, which analyzed data from a pair of previous study populations, found that people aged 55 and over who maintained a Mediterranean-style diet reduced their risk of developing late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by 41%.

Source: Mediterranean Diet Associated with 41% Risk Reduction for AMD | MD Magazine

Macular Degeneration: Mediterranean diet cuts risks of age-related blindness

From Xinhua..

Researchers from the European Union (EU) have found mounting evidence that the Mediterranean diet provides a better and more balanced lifestyle in daily consumption of food varieties that helps prevent potential blindness in later stages of life, said a study released Sunday.The EU scientists expanded their research on previous studies and discovered that a poor diet plays an important role in developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the United States.In analyzing the connection between genes and lifestyle on the development of AMD, the researchers found that people who maintain a Mediterranean diet, which features less meat but more fish, vegetables, fruits, legumes, unrefined grains and olive oil, cuts their risk of developing late-stage AMD by 41 percent.

Source: Mediterranean diet cuts risks of age-related blindness: study – Xinhua | English.news.cn

Which country does the Mediterranean diet actually come from? 

From SBS:

Rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and olive oil, the diet is famed for being low in saturated fats and high in lean sources of protein like fish. Red wine, drunk in moderation, is even a bonus inclusion.

Yet the term ‘Mediterranean diet’ is a bit loose. It’s meant to infer a particular ‘Mediterranean’ identity to a specific cultural dietary pattern. But the fact is, the Mediterranean basin spans 22 countries across Europe, Asia and Africa, and each country along the Mediterranean Sea boasts a different diet, religion and culture.

Source: Which country does the Mediterranean diet actually come from? | SBS Food