Category Archives: QOTD

QOTD: U of Cambridge virologist Greatorex on the chance of #relapse after #COVID19 #Coronavirus

Artist’s rendition of Coronavirus

…[Relapse] doesn’t happen with these respiratory viruses. The symptoms that drag on are your body’s response to the virus, but the virus is gone after a few days. I take great umbrage at the lengths of time you are meant to be infectious for because it is just not true. Nine days is nonsense. You don’t excrete a live virus that long.

Those studies are not checking for live virus, they are checking for genome. They do something called a PCR test (polymerase chain reaction), which is the test we are using to diagnose patients. It doesn’t tell you that you have live virus in your nose, it tells you have had it. For about 72 hours of a viral infection you have a live virus. In children it can last for longer – four or five days have been observed in flu.

So, there’s a big difference between how long we can detect the virus and how long they can infect someone else. With this coronavirus the only way you can say, yes, they are still shedding live virus – which is the only thing that will infect someone else, is if you take that sample from the patient and extract it and put it on tissue culture cells and then see it growing. That is done very rarely. There are not a lot of studies that look at live viruses. It is very easy to do PCR tests. It is harder to do live virus studies.

Source: Cambridge virologist explains what we do and don’t know about Covid-19

QOTD: Israel Shamir on Fear of Death

This too shall pass

The seasonal madness overtook mankind. In years to pass, it will be remembered as a new Witch Hunt, but on a global scale. The Salem affair engulfed a small town in a remote British colony, while the Corona lockdown broke the back of the global economy, pauperised millions, imprisoned three billion people, caused uncounted suicides and misery. It could be compared with World War One, when the West at the peak of its historic achievement rushed towards its self-destruction for reasons so feeble that none of the contemporary actors was able to explain them convincingly.

The madness is fuelled by fear of death. Death, this normal occurrence for our ancestors, a peaceful transformation, when the discarded body is laid to rest in the churchyard after the soul has departed to its Creator, became the worst thing to happen to man, a disaster to be avoided at all costs, because there is no hereafter, no Creator for the soul to return to, but only here and now. They embarked on the War on Death, as our colleague CJ Hopkins observed. Trying to escape death, mankind inflicted upon itself a mortal wound.

Source: Fighting the Worldwide War on Death, by Israel Shamir – The Unz Review

 

QOTD: James Thompson on Coronavirus Counter-Measures

If life is an IQ test, then dealing with pandemics is a high-priority item. Getting the right answer may save your life, so test-taking motivation ought to be high.

At first glance, the answer is obvious: avoid ill people, and if in doubt, avoid people. That ought to do it. Stay quietly in a room until the whole thing blows over. If you have the means, that room should be guarded on either side by fires. Such was the advice the Pope received during the Great Pestilence, and following it saved his life. Not everyone can afford such luxurious protection, but the principles are clear: since there must be a means of transmission, a blazing fire is likely to consume the noxious agent, whatever it is. As for visitors, they are to be kept away, preferably in a guarded place, like the ship they came in, moored at a safe distance for forty days, the Venetian quaranta giorni which worked well to protect them. Those inland principalities which harshly confined plague victims to die with their families in their bricked-up houses were able to save their other citizens. Tough governance. Forty days in the wilderness and the whole thing is over.

                                                         – James Thompson

QOTD: Is Blogging Dead?

I’m wondering if the age of blogging is at an end. 12 years ago blogs were the way to express ideas to a wider audience. Twitter and most of the social media we take for granted today was around, but it was certainly less endemic as it is now. Hell, even YouTube was still privately owned back then. If you wanted to build an online media brand you had to really believe in what you were doing to make the effort worthwhile. Blogging has always been a labor of love. That’s especially true today because everyone on social media today is their own Brand of Me. If all you do it curate an Instagram account with no other function than to show off how great a life you live, congratulations, you are your brand. It’s second nature to us now, but it used to take a lot more effort to relate your digital consciousness to an audience. That was what you used to blog for.

-Rollo Tomassi in 2020

Source: Exit Dalrock

PS: All three of my blogs have seen reduced traffic over the last year.

QOTD: Fred Reed on Democracy

An American conceit is that democracy is good and more democracy, better. Unfortunately, the truth is that more democracy means worse results. Placing governance in the hands of the empty-headed, dimwitted, and inattentive, these being the most numerous classes, inevitably leads to disaster.

Fred Reed

QOTD: Paul Craig Roberts on Truth-Telling

The problem with truth is that it seldom supports establishment interests. Thus, truth is in the way of material and selfish interests of the powerful. That is why it is hard to defend truth and why so few do so. To tell the truth is extremely costly.

Paul Craig Roberts in 2020

 

QOTD: Paul Craig Roberts on Revisionist History

Tens of millions died in World War II, including many civilians

“Historians, and even book reviewers, who tell the truth pay a high price. For reasons I provide in my review [of David Irving’s Hitler’s War and Churchill’s War], generally it is decades after a war before truth about the war can emerge. By then the court historians have fused lies with patriotism and created a pleasing myth about the war, and when emerging truth impinges on that myth, the truth-teller is denounced for making a case for the enemy.

Wars are fought with words as well as with bullets and bombs. The propaganda and demonization of the enemy are extreme. This is especially the case when it is the victors who start the war and have to cover up this fact as well as the war crimes for which they are responsible. When decades later the covered up crimes of the victors are brought to light, truth is up against the explanation that has been controlled for a half century. This makes the truth seem outlandish, and this makes it easy to demonize and even destroy the historian who brought the truth to the surface.”

If you think you know much about the history of World War II, check out this iconoclastic review at Unz.com.