Category Archives: Recipes

Recipe: Rosemary Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Onion

Final product without Parmesan sprinkles. That's sous vide chicken in the foreground.

Final product without Parmesan sprinkles. That’s sous vide chicken in the foreground.

At my request, my wife bought me a mess o’ Brussels sprouts, and I’ve been experimenting with recipes.

Sprouts sliced in half

Sprouts sliced in half

Ingredients this time are the sprouts, dried rosemary (i.e., not fresh although it grows where I live), salt, pepper, extra virgin olive oil, fresh garlic, and diced onion.

FYI, rosemary is used as an ornamental landscaping plant in southern Arizona.

To promote release of flavor, I sautéed three garlic cloves and the rosemary in EVOO.

Releasing the flavors of garlic and rosemary over medium heat for perhaps 3 minutes

Releasing the flavors of garlic and rosemary over medium heat for perhaps 3 minutes

Then I sliced the sprouts in half along their long axis, to reduce cooking time. (Cut them so the leaves stay attached to the internal stalk.) You’d have to cut them in half before you eat ’em anyway.

I dumped all ingredients into a bowel and mixed thoroughly to ensure the sprouts were coated with oil.

Ready for the oven

Ready for the oven. I used about 3/4 cup of diced onion.

Everything except the bowl was transferred to a cooking sheet covered with aluminum foil (easy clean-up!), which I then popped into an oven pre-heated to 425°F. I cooked for 25 minutes. At around the 10 and 17-minute marks, I pulled the concoction out of the oven and stirred/flipped the ingredients to promote even cooking and browning. Your cooking time will vary from 17 to 25 minutes depending on your preferences. If you want some browning of the sprouts, you likely need to cook longer than 17 minutes. Unless your oven runs hotter than mine.

This is my favorite roasted Brussels sprouts recipe thus far. For an extra flavor zing, sprinkle with some Parmesan cheese just before eating. In the future, I may  top the ingredients with some other type of cheese a minute before the cooking is completed. Bacon bits are another tasty option.

Steve Parker, M.D.

Not "real" Parmesan from Italy. For example, this one contains cellulose "to prevent caking."

Not “real” Parmesan from the Parma region of Italy. For example, this one contains cellulose “to prevent caking.”

 

Roasted Radishes and Brussels Sprouts

Roasted Radishes and Brussels Sprouts. Copyright Steve Parker MD

Roasted Radishes and Brussels Sprouts

A year ago I ran across online praise for roasted radishes. I’m not a big fan of radishes, perhaps because they weren’t part of Parker cuisine when I was growing up, but finally gave them a try.

Beautiful, huh?

Beautiful, huh?

This won’t be as detailed as most of my recipes because I ran out of time.

Raw Brussels Sprouts

Raw Brussels Sprouts

My basic ingredients were raw radishes and Brussels sprouts, diced onions, a bit of parsley (probably not needed), extra virgin olive oil, dried rosemary (i.e., not fresh), coarse salt, and pepper.

With the radishes, I cut off the little rootlet and green top, then cut them in half unless they were tiny radishes. Brussel sprouts take longer to cook, so I cut them in half, too. I put all the veggies  into a bowl, added just enough olive oil to coat them, sprinkled in some salt and pepper, then mixed with a spoon. Then I spread all that on a cooking sheet and popped it into an oven pre-heated to 425°F. (I covered my cooking sheet with aluminum foil to ease cleanup.)

All ingredients mixed in a bowl

All ingredients mixed in a bowl

I cooked in the oven for 17 minutes (15-20), using a turner to flip the veggies once or twice while cooking.

Ready for roasting

Ready for roasting

They were a little bland, so I topped off with Weber Roasted Garlic and Herb Seasoning. I enjoyed them and will do it again. Next time I may try coating with melted butter rather than olive oil. I felt very virtuous for eating my vegetables.

Steve Parker, M.D. 

PS: I ate half of this in one sitting. I refrigerated the rest and ate it about six hours later. It was much more flavorful. If you’re one of those people who never eats leftovers…

…reconsider.

Recipe: Sous Vide Chicken with Sautéed Sugar Snap Peas

Sous vide chicken and sautéed sugar snap peas

Click the pic for our YouTube demonstration.

Ingredients:

2 boneless skinless chicken breasts, 8-9 oz each (225-255 g each) (raw weight)

2.5 tbsp (37 ml) extra virgin olive oil

few sprigs of fresh rosemary (optional)

2 cloves garlic, diced

lemon-pepper seasoning

Montreal Steak Seasoning to taste

garlic salt to taste

Morton sea salt (coarse)

black pepper to taste

9 oz (255 g) fresh sugar snap peas

Instructions:

Choose one of two seasonings: 1) Montreal Steak or 2)  Rosemary lemon-pepper.

Brush one side of the breasts with about 1/2 tbsp olive oil. For Rosemary-style chicken, sprinkle the breasts with lemon-pepper seasoning, sea salt, and pepper to taste. Garnish with rosemary sprigs.

For Montreal-style, that seasoning is all you need; it already contains salt and pepper. Rosemary sprigs are optional.

Then cook the breasts in a sous vide device (see video) at 142°F for two hours.

When that’s done, my wife likes to sear the breasts in a frying pan (with a little olive oil) over medium-high heat, 1–2 minutes on each side. The chicken is fully cooked after two hours in the sous vide device, but the searing may enhance the flavor and appearance. It’s optional.

When the chicken is close to being done, sauté the garlic in two oz of olive oil over medium high heat for a minute or two, then add the sugar snap peas and a little garlic salt and pepper to taste, and cook for two to four minutes, stirring frequently.

Number of servings: 2

AMD boxes: 1 veggie, 2 fat, 1 protein

Nutritional analysis per serving:

Calories: 500

Calorie breakdown: 42% fat, 8% carbohydrate, 50% protein

Carb grams: 10

Fiber grams: 4

Digestible carb grams: 6

Prominent nutrients: protein, B6, iron, niacin, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, selenium

 

 

 

 

Is It Time You Got a Pressure Cooker?

Vegetarian Fried Rice with bits of cabbage, carrot, celery, and (?) cilantro.

Vegetarian Fried Rice with bits of cabbage, carrot, celery, and (?) cilantro.

Judging from the bloggers I follow, pressure cookers started making a comeback within the last couple years. I remember my mother decades ago occasionally using one, for what, I don’t know. I’ve been thinking about a pressure cooker myself recently as I learn more about Indian cooking.

As you may know, many Indians are vegetarians. The eat lots of legumes, as do non-veg Indians, as an important source of protein. If you cook dried beans, it normally takes hours unless you get them from a can, pre-cooked. A pressure cooker reduces cooking time to 40 minutes.

Dr. Travis Saunders recently wrote about his pressure cooker, which was inspired by Dr. Stephan Guyenet. Travis wrote:

For those who are unfamiliar with pressure cookers, they’re a bit like slow cookers. The difference is that they seal in pressure (this is why the old fashioned ones sometimes exploded when left unattended), so they can cook food much faster than a regular stove or slow cooker. So things that would normally cook all day, can be cooked in under an hour.

Travis uses his to make yogurt and soup. It also cooks rice. 

I’m gonna get one.

Steve Parker, M.D.

DietDoctor’s Low-Carb Recipes: Now Much More User-Friendly

That's a guacamole deviled egg

That’s a guacamole deviled egg

They’ve always been good recipes—including the all-important nutrient analysis—but they’re even better now.

From DietDoctor:

“Our low-carb recipe site is probably already the most popular one in the world, with over 100,000 daily pageviews, several hundred recipes and gorgeous images. Now we’re adding even more great functions.You can now change the number of servings for recipes – the ingredient amount will correspond to the number of servings – and you can now also choose between the US or the metric measurement systems for ingredients. All to make it simpler to use our recipes.

We’ve also added a function for members so that it is now possible to save your personal favorite recipes. To activate the latter feature you need to be logged in, so that your selections can be saved for later.”

Source: The World’s Best Low-Carb Recipes Just Got Better – Diet Doctor

I Finally Tried Quinoa

Not my cup o' tea

Not my cup o’ tea

Quinoa has been trendy for several years. Proponents tout its relatively high protein and fiber content. My daughter wanted to try it, so we cooked some together. She chose Giada De Laurentiis’ Herbed Quinoa recipe.

It was just OK. I doubt quinoa will ever be in my top 20 favorite recipes. If I run across it in a restaurant, I’ll try it one more time.

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: Even if you don’t know how to pronounce quinoa, you’ll have no trouble with 99.9% of the words in my books.

Recipe: Bacon Bit Brussels Sprouts

Bacon Bit Brussels Sprouts

Bacon Bit Brussels Sprouts

You can incorporate this meal into the Advanced Mediterranean Diet, Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet, or Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet since I provide the nutritional analysis below.

A while back I posted a meal recipe for Bacon Brussels Sprouts to accompany Brian Burgers. To make it a little more convenient, I’ve substituted off-the-shelf real bacon bits instead of frying my own bacon. I traded olive oil for the bacon grease. The two versions taste very similar.

diabetic diet, paleobetic diet, low-carb diet

It took 10 minutes of chopping to shred the sprouts

Ingredients:

1 lb (454 g) Brussels sprouts, raw, shredded (slice off and discard the bases first)

4 tbsp (60 ml) extra virgin olive oil

5 tbsp (75 ml or 35 g real bacon bits or crumbles (e.g., by Hormel or Oscar Mayer)

2 garlic cloves, minced (optional)

1/8 (0.6 ml) tsp salt

1/4 tsp (1.2 ml) ground black pepper

3 tbsp (45 ml) water

Instructions:

diabetic diet, paleobetic diet, low-carb diet

Steaming in progress

You’ll be steaming this in a pan with a lid. Put the garlic and olive oil in a pan and cook over medium-high heat for a few minutes to release the flavor of the garlic. Add the water to the pan and let it warm up for a half a minute or so on medium-high heat. Then add the shredded sprouts and cover with the lid. After a minute on this medium-high heat, turn it down to medium. The sprouts will have to cook for only 4–6 minutes. Every minute, shake the pan to keep contents from sticking. You might need to remove the lid and stir with a spoon once, but that lets ourtyour steam and may prolong cooking time. The sprouts are soft when done. Then remove from heat, add the bacon bits, salt, and pepper, then mix thoroughly.

When time allows, I’d like to experiment with this by leaving out the bacon and using various spices instead. Do you know what goes well with Brussels sprouts?

Number of Servings: 3 (1 cup or 240 ml each)

Nutritional Analysis per Serving:

Advanced Mediterranean Diet boxes: 2 veggie, 1.5 fat

71% fat

19% carbohydrate

10% protein

270 calories

14 g carbohydrate

6 g fiber

8 g digestible carbohydrate

328 mg sodium

646 mg potassium

Prominent feature: High in vitamin C (over 10o% of your RDA)

diabetic diet, low-carb diet, paleobetic diet

Brian burger and bacon Brussels sprouts