Category Archives: QOTD

QOTD: Israel Shamir on Fear of Death

This too shall pass

The seasonal madness overtook mankind. In years to pass, it will be remembered as a new Witch Hunt, but on a global scale. The Salem affair engulfed a small town in a remote British colony, while the Corona lockdown broke the back of the global economy, pauperised millions, imprisoned three billion people, caused uncounted suicides and misery. It could be compared with World War One, when the West at the peak of its historic achievement rushed towards its self-destruction for reasons so feeble that none of the contemporary actors was able to explain them convincingly.

The madness is fuelled by fear of death. Death, this normal occurrence for our ancestors, a peaceful transformation, when the discarded body is laid to rest in the churchyard after the soul has departed to its Creator, became the worst thing to happen to man, a disaster to be avoided at all costs, because there is no hereafter, no Creator for the soul to return to, but only here and now. They embarked on the War on Death, as our colleague CJ Hopkins observed. Trying to escape death, mankind inflicted upon itself a mortal wound.

Source: Fighting the Worldwide War on Death, by Israel Shamir – The Unz Review

 

QOTD: James Thompson on Coronavirus Counter-Measures

If life is an IQ test, then dealing with pandemics is a high-priority item. Getting the right answer may save your life, so test-taking motivation ought to be high.

At first glance, the answer is obvious: avoid ill people, and if in doubt, avoid people. That ought to do it. Stay quietly in a room until the whole thing blows over. If you have the means, that room should be guarded on either side by fires. Such was the advice the Pope received during the Great Pestilence, and following it saved his life. Not everyone can afford such luxurious protection, but the principles are clear: since there must be a means of transmission, a blazing fire is likely to consume the noxious agent, whatever it is. As for visitors, they are to be kept away, preferably in a guarded place, like the ship they came in, moored at a safe distance for forty days, the Venetian quaranta giorni which worked well to protect them. Those inland principalities which harshly confined plague victims to die with their families in their bricked-up houses were able to save their other citizens. Tough governance. Forty days in the wilderness and the whole thing is over.

                                                         – James Thompson

QOTD: Is Blogging Dead?

I’m wondering if the age of blogging is at an end. 12 years ago blogs were the way to express ideas to a wider audience. Twitter and most of the social media we take for granted today was around, but it was certainly less endemic as it is now. Hell, even YouTube was still privately owned back then. If you wanted to build an online media brand you had to really believe in what you were doing to make the effort worthwhile. Blogging has always been a labor of love. That’s especially true today because everyone on social media today is their own Brand of Me. If all you do it curate an Instagram account with no other function than to show off how great a life you live, congratulations, you are your brand. It’s second nature to us now, but it used to take a lot more effort to relate your digital consciousness to an audience. That was what you used to blog for.

-Rollo Tomassi in 2020

Source: Exit Dalrock

PS: All three of my blogs have seen reduced traffic over the last year.

QOTD: Fred Reed on Democracy

An American conceit is that democracy is good and more democracy, better. Unfortunately, the truth is that more democracy means worse results. Placing governance in the hands of the empty-headed, dimwitted, and inattentive, these being the most numerous classes, inevitably leads to disaster.

Fred Reed

QOTD: Paul Craig Roberts on Truth-Telling

The problem with truth is that it seldom supports establishment interests. Thus, truth is in the way of material and selfish interests of the powerful. That is why it is hard to defend truth and why so few do so. To tell the truth is extremely costly.

Paul Craig Roberts in 2020

 

QOTD: Paul Craig Roberts on Revisionist History

Tens of millions died in World War II, including many civilians

“Historians, and even book reviewers, who tell the truth pay a high price. For reasons I provide in my review [of David Irving’s Hitler’s War and Churchill’s War], generally it is decades after a war before truth about the war can emerge. By then the court historians have fused lies with patriotism and created a pleasing myth about the war, and when emerging truth impinges on that myth, the truth-teller is denounced for making a case for the enemy.

Wars are fought with words as well as with bullets and bombs. The propaganda and demonization of the enemy are extreme. This is especially the case when it is the victors who start the war and have to cover up this fact as well as the war crimes for which they are responsible. When decades later the covered up crimes of the victors are brought to light, truth is up against the explanation that has been controlled for a half century. This makes the truth seem outlandish, and this makes it easy to demonize and even destroy the historian who brought the truth to the surface.”

If you think you know much about the history of World War II, check out this iconoclastic review at Unz.com.

QOTD: H.L. Mencken on Practical Politics

The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary.

—H.L. Mencken (born in 1880)

QOTD: Paul Craig Roberts on Slavery

A slave is a person who does not own his own labor. Therefore, the product of his labor, or some portion of it, is not his. For medieval serfs the maximum tax rate was 30%. Given the technology of the time, a higher tax rate so dispossessed serfs that the population could not reproduce, and the sefts would revolt.

19th century slaves worked with better technology, and their higher productivity meant that 50% of their work product could be taken by their owners. This was not all profit as owners had to pay handsomely for the labor, but instead of paying the laborer, the slave owner paid the slave merchant who paid the black African king of Dahomey who captured the black slaves. 

In contrast, prior to the 1981 Reagan tax rate reduction, the maximum tax rate on investment income was 70% and the maximum tax rate on wage and salary income was 50 percent.

Today every Western taxpayer is a slave in the same economic sense as slaves in prior times. Today the Western citizen does not own his own labor. He owns only a part of it. The rest belongs to the slave master, that is, the government. The enslavement of the entire working population of the United States occured in 1913 with the enactment of the income tax. This enslavement is color blind.

QOTD: Steve Martin on Success

“Be so good they can’t ignore you.”

That was what Steve Martin said when he was being interviewed by Charlie Rose and Rose asked what advice Martin would give to a young people.

Martin continued, “ . . . it’s not the answer they want to hear.”

according to Wilder, Wealthy, and Wise.

Steve Parker MD, Advanced Mediterranean Diet

Click the pic to purchase at Amazon.com in the U.S.

QOTD: Denninger on Politics and Blackmail

“I have long considered that one of the primary qualifications for being “accepted” into the major parties as a serious candidate (for anything) is that you’re able to be blackmailed.  There has to be something in your past that they know about and can use to “keep you in line.”  There is an utterly-ridiculous over-representation of people in the US Congress and other “high positions” that have been accused (or even proved) to have had interest in “little girls”, as an example, which has led to the (not very funny) anecdote that the only way to “get” this politician or that is to find them with a dead girl — or live boy.

As just one example I give you Dennis Hastert, who was Speaker of the House.  Long after he left office (but sadly for him, before he died) he was accused of structuring transactions illegally to pay off a kid he allegedly did inappropriate things with before he was in the House at all, say much less before he was Speaker.  It beggars belief that nobody knew of this alleged indiscretion before Hastert ascended to the House itself, say much less Speaker of the House.

Therefore this is a perfectly reasonable question: Who blackmailed him and what did they get?  I remind you that the Speaker of the House has near-absolute control over what is and isn’t heard on the floor and thus what bills can and cannot be voted on.”

Source.