Can Diet Improve Your Gingivitis or Periodontitis?

Yes...at least according to a tiny short-term study done in Germany. Only 10 experimental subjects. The researchers didn’t call it a paleo diet but that’s what it looks like to me.

Here’s their description of the food: “..low in carbohydrates, rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, and rich in vitamins C and D, antioxidants and fiber for four weeks.” How low in carbs? To a level “as far as possible to a level < 130 grams/day.” Click the link above for full diet details. By my reading, it qualifies as a paleo diet.

Certified paleo-compliant, plus high omega-3 fatty acids and low-carb

The researchers note in the body of their report that they can’t tell for sure which components of the experimental diet were most helpful, but they suspect it’s 1) the carbohydrate restriction, 2) increased omega-3 fatty acids, and 3) reduced omega-6 consumption.

Those three factors are at play in the both the Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet and Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet, both of which are options in my book, The Advanced Mediterranean Diet (2nd Ed.).

Here’s the study’s abstract for you science nerds:

Background

The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of four weeks of an oral health optimized diet on periodontal clinical parameters in a randomized controlled trial.

Methods

The experimental group (n = 10) had to change to a diet low in carbohydrates, rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, and rich in vitamins C and D, antioxidants and fiber for four weeks. Participants of the control group (n = 5) did not change their dietary behavior. Plaque index, gingival bleeding, probing depths, and bleeding upon probing were assessed by a dentist with a pressure-sensitive periodontal probe. Measurements were performed after one and two weeks without a dietary change (baseline), followed by a two week transitional period, and finally performed weekly for four weeks.

Results

Despite constant plaque values in both groups, all inflammatory parameters decreased in the experimental group to approximately half that of the baseline values (GI: 1.10 ± 0.51 to 0.54 ± 0.30; BOP: 53.57 to 24.17 %; PISA: 638 mm2 to 284 mm2). This reduction was significantly different compared to that of the control group.

Conclusion

A diet low in carbohydrates, rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, rich in vitamins C and D, and rich in fibers can significantly reduce gingival and periodontal inflammation.

Thanks to BioMed Central for making the entire report available for free.

Reference:

An oral health optimized diet can reduce gingival and periodontal inflammation in humans – a randomized controlled pilot study

  • J. P. WoelberEmail author,
  • K. Bremer,
  • K. Vach,
  • D. König,
  • E. Hellwig,
  • P. Ratka-Krüger,
  • A. Al-Ahmad and
  • C. Tennert
BMC Oral Health 2016, 17:28

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12903-016-0257-1

Published: 26 July 2016

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s