Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause Overweight and Type 2 Diabetes?

We don’t know with certainty yet. But a recent study suggests that non-caloric artificial sweeteners do indeed cause overweight and type 2 diabetes in at least some folks. The study at hand is very small, so I wouldn’t bet the farm on it. I’m not even changing any of my recommendations at this point.

exercise for weight loss and management, dumbbells

“Too many diet sodas” doesn’t explain this whole picture

 

The proposed mechanism for adverse metallic effects is that the sweeteners alter the mix of germs that live in our intestines. That alteration in turn causes  the overweight and obesity. See MedPageToday for the complicated details. The first part of the article is about mice; humans are at the end.

Some quotes:

“Our results from short- and long-term human non-caloric sweetener consumer cohorts suggest that human individuals feature a personalized response to non-caloric sweeteners, possibly stemming from differences in their microbiota composition and function,” the researchers wrote.

The researchers further suggested that these individualized nutritional responses may be driven by personalized functional differences in the micro biome [intestinal germs or bacteria].

***

Diabetes researcher Robert Rizza, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who was not involved with the research, called the findings “fascinating.”

He noted that earlier research suggests people who eat large amounts of artificial sweeteners have higher incidences of obesity and diabetes. The new research, he said, suggests there may be a causal link.

“This was a very thorough and carefully done study, and I think the message to people who use artificial sweeteners is they need to use them in moderation,” he said. “Drinking 17 diet sodas a day is probably a bad idea, but one or two may be OK.”

I won’t argue with that last sentence!

Finally, be aware the several clinical studies show no linkage between human consumption of non-caloric artificial sweeteners and overweight, obesity, and T2 diabetes.

Steve Parker, M.D.

Four In Ten U.S. Adults Will Develop Diabetes

Like type 1 diabetics, many type 2's need insulin shots

Like type 1 diabetics, many type 2’s need insulin shots

Researchers affiliated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control estimate that 40% of American adults will develop diabetes, mostly type 2. The CDC’s prior estimate was the one of every three Americans born in 2000 would develop diabetes. Some snippets from the article abstract:

On the basis of 2000—11 data, lifetime risk of diagnosed diabetes from age 20 years was 40·2% for men and 39·6% for women, representing increases of 20 percentage points and 13 percentage points, respectively, since 1985—89.

The number of life-years lost to diabetes when diagnosed at age 40 years decreased from 7·7 years in 1990—99 to 5·8 years in 2000—11 in men, and from 8·7 years to 6·8 years in women over the same period.

Years spent with diabetes increased by 156% in men and 70% in women.

The good news is that you can decrease your odds of type 2 diabetes via diet and exercise. I can’t prove it, but I bet the Advanced Mediterranean Diet prevents some cases of diabetes. The single most important issue in preventing type 2 diabetes is avoiding obesity.

Steve Parker, M.D.

 

New Weight Loss Drug, Contrave, May Work But Also Cause Suicidal Thoughts

"These are flying off the shelves!"

“This’ll fix you right up!”

The FDA recently approved a new weight-loss drug for the U.S. market. It’s marketed as Contrave, a combination of naltrexone and bupropion.

Neither of the components is new. Naltrexone’s been used to treat alcohol and narcotic addiction. Bupropion, e.g., Wellbutrin, is for depression and smoking cessation.

Contrave joins two other recent drugs for weight loss. Belviq and Qsymia were approved in 2012. I still haven’t run across anyone using those.

To qualify for the new formulation, you need a body mass index over 30, or over 27 plus one or more weight-related medical condition such as type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure.

If you haven’t lost over 5% of your initial body weight in the first 12 weeks of use, the FDA recommends stopping the drug.

Potential adverse effects include suicidal thoughts and seizures. More commonly, users may experience headache, nausea, constipation, diarrhea, dizziness, insomnia, and dry mouth. Constipation and diarrhea?!

Even with the drug, you still have to be on a reduced-calorie diet and exercise program.

Why not try the Advanced Mediterranean Diet or Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet first?

Steve Parker, M.D.

Magnesium Supplementation May Enhance Effects of Exercise in Elderly Women

…according to this study published at American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Average age of study subjects was 71

Average age of study subjects was 71

Weekly mild exercise sessions were supplemented with 300 mg/day of magnesium. Those taking the supplement showed improved physical performance compared with control subjects. Whether effects are long-lasting is unknown; the study lasted only 12 weeks.

Steve Parker, M.D.

Low-Carb Beats Low-Fat Diet for Weight Loss Without Increase in Heart Disease Risk

…according to an article at MedPageToday.

Many physicians have been reluctant to recommend low-carb diets out of fear that they increase cardiovascular risk. A recent study compared low-carb to low-fat dieting over 12 months and actually found better improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors on the low-carb diet (max of 40 grams a day).

After 12 months, folks on a low-carbohydrate diet had lost 5.3 kg (11.7 lb), while those on a low-fat diet with similar caloric value had lost 1.8 kg (3.9 lb). Both groups showed lowering of LDL cholesterol, while the low-carbers had better improvements in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides.

DietDoctor Andreas Eenfeldt can add this study to his list of others that show better weight loss with low-carb diets compared to low-fat.

Steve Parker, M.D.

How Do You Find a Compatible Church?

Let’s say you’re not happy with the ideology of your current church or you quit going to church years ago and are thinking about returning. Do you want a liberal or a conservative church?  How would you find a church where you fit in?

One starting point would be to review a neat graphic put together by Tobin Grant. (Sorry, non-Americans, this is mostly about American churches. But there are data points for atheists and agnostics, too.)

Based on surveys of churchgoers, Mr. Grant classifies churches by where they stand on size of government and “protection of morality.” I’m not saying this is the best way to choose a church; it’s one way to get started.

Happy hunting!

Steve Parker, M.D.

Skipping Breakfast Doesn’t Affect Weight Loss

…at least not in this 16-week study.