Who Should a Christian Marry?

I’m parking these NYCPastor links here for future reference:

10 Women Christian Men Should Not Marry

10 Men Christian Women Should Not Marry

 

Hike: Pinnacle Peak Park, Scottsdale, AZ

ppp

Half-way up to the highest point

This was just a one-hour training hike covering 2.5 miles and 523 feet of vertical elevation. I started at the west end, walked to the highest point of the trail, then turned around and came back.

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Typical trail appearance: mostly gravel

Mostly locals use this urban trail. You’ll see lots of 20–40-year-olds jogging it.

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The west trailhead elevation is 2366 ft above sea level

The weather was sunny, 76° F. I thank God for another day in paradise.

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: I start my mileage at the closest road near the west trailhead; it’s about a quarter mile to the formal trailhead marker.

Recipe: Natchez Eggs

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This particular batch contained Bacon Bits

Natchez Eggs is an old family recipe.  It’s sort of an egg casserole, good for breakfast.  We tend to dust off this recipe when we have house guests—it feeds many people at once, quickly and easily.

It’s not in The Advanced Mediterranean Diet (2nd Edition) or KMD: Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet, although it’s compatible with both of those.

Note my use of both U.S. customary and metric measurements, which I also use in the books. I have no idea how much it costs to ship a book from the U.S. to New Zealand, but the e-book versions (AMD or KMD) have no shipping charges.

The low carbohydrate content of this dish is a bonus if you have diabetes, prediabetes, or metabolic syndrome.

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Note the light brown crust which tells you it’s probably finished cooking

Ingredients

Cheese, shredded (four-cheese mexican blend), 8 0z (224 g)
Sour cream, 16 oz (448 g)
Green chiles, diced, canned, 8 oz net weight (224g)
Eggs, large, 10 (50 g each)

Preparation

Pre-heat oven to 350°F (175°C).  Mix eggs thoroughly in a blender for 3–4 minutes on medium speed, then pour into bowl.  Coat a baking dish (9 x13 inches, or 22 x 34 cm) with butter, vegetable oil, PAM or no-stick baking spray.  Whisk eggs and sour cream together in bowl.  Drain excess water from the chile cans, then spread chiles evenly on the bottom of a dish, then layer the cheese evenly on top.  Next, ladle or pour the eggs/sour cream on top.  Bake for about 30 minutes, until the eggs are firm, not runny, and you see patches of thin light brown crust.

Number of Servings

12 servings of 4 oz or 110 g each.  Leftovers hold up well in refrigerator for eating over the next few days.

Nutrient Analysis

A serving has 3 grams of digestible carbohydrate, 200 calories, 140 calories from fat, 8 grams of saturated fat, 10 grams of protein, 210 mg cholesterol, 4 grams of carboydrate, 1 gram of fiber (so only 3 grams of digestible carb).

Advanced Mediterranean Diet boxes: 1 fat and 1/2 protein

Options

After you add the cheese layer, sprinkle layer of  Hormel Real Crumbled Bacon (4 oz or 112 g) before finishing up with the  egg mixture.  This adds 33 calories and zero carbs per serving.  Or just serve with bacon on the side (my preference).  An alternative to the Hormel product is to cook and crumble your own bacon (12 oz or 340 g uncooked weight).  Using too much bacon will overwhelm the other flavors.  Experiment with different cheeses.

You can also tweak it if you wish with additional ingredients such as diced bell peppers or chopped green onions (chives). I wouldn’t add more than one ingredient per batch. I wonder if small chunks of broccoli would work.

Steve Parker, M.D.

Hike: Marcus Landslide Trail at McDowell Sonoran Preserve

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Yesterday I started my training in preparation to tackle Arizona’ Mount Humphries in June. I and about 20 people from my son’s Boy Scout troop hiked the Marcus Landslide Trail. Near the end of that trail we created a loop by hitting the Boulder Trail, Pemberton Trail, and Rock Knob Trail. Total hike was 5.8 miles in 60-68° F weather.

It’s a mostly flat course and an easy walk. It was no physical strain at all at the time. But I had some muscle cramps in bed last night and some soreness around my hips and thighs today. The soreness is a good sign. I’m embarrassed I’m not in better shape.

The scouts are doing a 20-mile hike in March for the Hiking merit badge. I’ll be right there with them, Lord willing.

Steve Parker, M.D.

Cholla cactus

Cholla cactus

That vertical rock formation in the center is called a mushroom

That vertical rock formation in the center is called a mushroom

Support This Blog Or I’ll Kill It!

You need a break. Enjoy.

I pay $3-12 to license many of the photos and diagrams here. I won’t steal someone else’s intellectual property.

Have you noticed how some blogs just fizzle out? No new posts for a year, then they’re gone?

One reason is that it costs money to maintain them. For instance, I pay WordPress $30/year to keep them from posting advertisements that would interfere with your reading pleasure. I also turn down many offers from advertisers who will pay me for access to my audience.

The biggest “cost” of the blog is my time that it takes to write posts.

I hope you find my writing worthwhile and interesting. You’ll find information here, at no cost, that should improve your health and longevity. What’s that worth?

If you’d like to support the blog, the best way is to buy one of my books, or recommend one to your friends or relatives. The second best way is to post a review of the book at Amazon.com. Even a brief one.

I’d be grateful for your support. Your continued readership is also encouraging to me.

Steve Parker, M.D.

 

Mediterranean Diet Linked to Longer Telomeres. So What?

Grapes are an iconic Mediterranean fruit

Grapes are an iconic Mediterranean fruit

Telomeres are very trendy in the research community. Like chia seeds and kale with hipster foodies.  Telomeres are repetitive chains of amino acids attached to strands of your DNA. The longer your telomeres, the lower your risk of chronic disease and premature death, generally speaking.

The massive Nurses Health Study showed that women who ate a Mediterranean-style diet had the longer telomeres, which is good. That fits with other evidence of greater longevity and lower chronic disease rates in Mediterranean dieters.

Click for a brief pertinent article at NEJM Journal Watch, which includes a link to the original research report.

To lose weight with the Mediterranean diet, check out my book, The Advanced Mediterranean Diet (2nd edition).

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: We don’t know if telomeres are longer in men eating Mediterranean-style

Testing Your Fitness When You’re Hungover is a Bad Idea

"Good job, maggot!"

“You can do better, Parker!”

It’s been 23 months since I last tested my fitness level in February, 2013. So on New Years’ Day I re-tested. My standard is the Army Physical Fitness Test, which is required for U.S. Army soldiers to pass every six months. I’ve never served in the military. The other military branches probably have their own fitness standards, but my dad was in the Army, so that’s what I use.

Unlike 23 months ago, I didn’t pass this time. I don’t like to exercise but I’ve been pretty good about doing it for 60–70 minutes a week, a combination of weight training and HIIT on a stationary bicycle.

My performance:

  • 2-mile run: 21 mins, 16 secs (FAIL; need 19 mins, 54 secs to pass)
  • military sit-ups: 25 (FAIL: need 27 to pass)
  • push-ups: 31 PASS
  • chip-ups: 7 (not part of the Army test but something I monitor)

My run, if you can call it that, was pitiful. I know I gave it my best effort because my thighs were sore for 48 hours thereafter. At one point I wondered if I could “speed walk” just as fast as I was jogging.

Military sit-ups are done with hands behind your head or neck. Doing sit-ups with my arms folded over my chest, I can do 30.

Yes, I’m disappointed. Why did I fail? I’m almost two years older, probably six pounds (2.7 kg) heavier (at 176 lb or 80 kg), and missed too many workouts.

My remedial plan to pass: Miss fewer workouts and lose six pounds of fat, then re-test. I don’t know if it’ll work.

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: Just kidding; I wasn’t hungover.